Audio of Gail Lewis’ Response to Sweet Sugar Rage at Translation Transmission

Thanks to everyone who come to our screening of Sweet Sugar Rage last night.

For those of you who missed it, you will be glad we recorded Dr Gail Lewis’ response to the film, which is featured below for your listening pleasure.

In the audio Gail reflects on the impact of Sistren’s visit to the Brixton Black Women’s Group in the 1980s, exploring how the feminist work translated across borders within the context of a Black feminist movement rooted in anti-imperialist and internationalist politics.

Gail also uses the conversation to reflect on how the cultural memory of the Black Women’s movement in the UK has been transmitted, and how this has shaped the politics of knowledge production within contemporary feminism more widely.

You can listen and download the audio by clicking through on this link.

Our final screening is on Sunday at 1pm. We are showing the Iranian film Facing Mirrors, get your tickets here.

We are delighted that Elhum Shakerifar will join us to discuss the film.

If you want to read up on the film, and Transgender in Iran more widely, you can read this blog post from the Ajam Media Collective and this article by Afsaneh Najmabadi.

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Final Two Screenings – Sweet Sugar Rage & Facing Mirrors

Thanks to everyone who came to today’s screening of Surname Viet, Given Name Nam!

We are now moving into the final week of Translation/ Transmission. This means there are only two screenings left!

DrHand drawn image of a working woman breaking a sugar caneTuesday 25 March 6pm – Sweet Sugar Rage, Sistren Theatre Collective

Founded in 1977, Sistren are a women’s popular theatre company based in Kingston, Jamaica, who use drama-in-education as a means of problem solving at a community level; questioning in particular society’s failure to value the work and skills of women. Sweet Sugar Rage highlights the harsh conditions facing female workers on a Jamaican sugar estate in the 80s. We travel from Kingston to the sugar cane fields of Clarendon and back again, guided by an infectious reggae rhythm.

The screening will be followed by a discussion with Dr Gail Lewis, long standing member of Brixton Black Women’s Group and a co-founder of the Organisation for Women of African and Asian Descent (OWAAD), who will reflect on her memories of Sistren’s visits to the UK.

Sunday 30 March 1pm – Facing Mirrors

Set in contemporary Iran, Facing Mirrors is a story of an unlikely and daring friendship that develops despite social norms and religious beliefs. Although Rana is a traditional wife and mother, she is forced to drive a cab to pay off the debt that keeps her husband in prison. By chance she picks up the wealthy and rebellious Edi, who is desperately awaiting a passport to leave the country. At first Rana attempts to help, but when she realizes that Edi is transgender, a dangerous series of conflicts arise.

Followed by a response from Elhum Shakerifar, programmer at Bird’s Eye View and documentary producer (The Reluctant Revolutionary).

facingmirrors_shayesteh_irani_and_ghazal_shakeri_04

We also have our final reading group meeting at Hydra Books on Wednesday at 7pm, reading ‘The Embodied Afterlives of Translation’ by Bliss Cua Lim.

Next Screenings for Translation/ Transmission

Audre Lorde stands in a park

We are reaching the mid-point for Translation/ Transmission so wanted to remind you of what is coming up this week.

On Tuesday 18 March at 6pm we are showing Dagmar Schultz’s beautiful biopic of her good friend Audre Lorde.

The film is an intimate portrayal of Lorde which allows us to see her as a transnational feminist figure who worked hard to facilitate the collective identities of the Afro-German community in Berlin.

We will also be screening a very special video made by Alexis Pauline Gumbs, who will be reading a letter she wrote to Audre Lorde as part of her activist-educational project The Eternal Summer of the Black Feminist Mind.

Tickets are selling fast so make sure you buy in advance.

On Sunday 23 March at 1pm we are showing Trinh T. Minh-ha’s Surname Viet Given Name Nam, a profoundly personal documentary explores the role of Vietnamese women historically and in contemporary society,

Using dance, printed texts, folk poetry and the words and experiences of Vietnamese women in Vietnam—from both North and South—and the United States, Trinh’s film challenges official culture with the voices of women.

Image of the same woman taken from several angles

Bristol based academic and self-proclaimed film nerd Carol O’Sullivan will be on hand afterwards to help guide the debate.

We are reading criticism relating to the film at this Wednesday’s reading group at Hydra books, 7-9pm, if you want to engage with the film’s theoretical ideas. Download the articles here and here – all welcome!

Don’t forget you can buy your tickets for the Intellect Books raffle at all screenings!

Hope to see you at Watershed for one of the shows!

Reading M. Jacqui Alexander…..

…is the best! You’ve never read her? Why not?!

‘What are the different intolerables from which we desire to flee? And how do we distinguish between those sites to which we must return and those from which we must flee entirely? What becomes of those who cannot flee, no matter how intolerable the conditions? In order to wrestle with these questions we would need to adopt as a daily practice, ways of being and relating, modes of analysing, and strategies of organising in which we constantly mobilize identification and solidarity, across all borders, as key elements in the repertoire of risks we need to take to see ourselves as part of one another, even in the context of difference. We would need to disappear the idiocy of “us” and “them” and its cultural relativist underpinnings, the belief that “it could never happen to us,” so that our very consciousness would be shaped by multiple histories and events, multiple geographies, multiple identifications.’

 M. Jacqui Alexander (2005) ‘Remembering This Bridge Called My Back, Remembering Ourselves’ in Pedagogies of Crossing: Meditations on Feminism, Sexual Politics, Memory and the Sacred, Durham: Duke University Press, pp. 257-287, p. 265.

And check out these videos….